COVID-19

Summary
  • Narrative
  • COVID-19 Treatment Protocols
  • Treatment items to purchase
  • Treatment items to purchase (optional)
  • Ivermectin's effectiveness against COVID-19
  • How to purchase Ivermectin
  • Dealing with hypercortisolism-like symptoms

Narrative

The motivation to compose this webpage came from my experience with COVID-19. The short version of what I went through is as follows:

I came down with what I thought was a serious case of the flu just before Christmas of 2020. However, it turned out to be COVID-19. My condition worsened into gastroenteritis and pneumonia by the second week. By the third week, I was seriously ill, using an oxygen machine almost around the clock, unable to eat, and experiencing terrible nights with uncontrollable coughing during the first part of the night, followed by cycles of cold sweats and chills throughout the rest of the night. By the fourth week, the gastroenteritis went away, but I could only eat bland foods for several weeks thereafter. The pneumonia symptoms also ceased to worsen. However, recovery from pneumonia is a multi-week, if not multi-month, process. I'm still recovering from the pneumonia. Also, during this time, I developed symptoms of hypercortisolism, which include dry mouth, constant urination (especially during the night), irritability and fatigue. I suspect the hypercortisolism came from the use of the drug methylprednisolone (a corticosteroid) which was used to control the inflammation from pneumonia, but there is no way to know the cause for sure. Recovery from hypercortisolism is also a slow process. Knowing what I know now, I would have immediately started the FLCCC Alliance protocol for early outpatient treatment discussed on this page.

COVID-19 Treatment Protocols (FLCCC Alliance recommendations)

For the treatment of COVID-19, the first and foremost drug to consider is ivermectin (see below on "Ivermectin's effectiveness against COVID-19").

Treatment items to purchase

These are the minimum items to purchase for the recommended prophylaxis and early outpatient protocols:

Treatment items to purchase (optional)

Ivermectin's effectiveness against COVID-19

How to purchase Ivermectin

Dealing with hypercortisolism-like symptoms

My symptoms included dry mouth, constant urination (especially during the night), irritability and fatigue. I was drinking as much as 3 liters of water during the night because of the dry mouth and terrible thirst. After over three weeks of these symptoms, I read about Ashwagandha and began taking this supplement. I believe Ashwagandha is what cured me (see below).

You can read more on Ashwagandha in this blog, Ashwagandha: Ancient Medicine for Modern Adrenals. Here are some highlights:

In addition to improving subjective symptoms of stress and anxiety, Ashwagandha may help regulate cortisol levels. Clinically and anecdotally, we observe Ashwagandha and other adaptogens to modulate both high and low cortisol levels and support a normal diurnal cortisol curve, which is highest in the morning upon waking and falls throughout the day, reaching the lowest cortisol level around midnight. Most clinical research has focused on Ashwagandha’s effect on down-regulating high cortisol levels and less on helping the adrenals raise cortisol levels when low. In one study, 64 subjects with a history of chronic stress were randomized to receive either 300 mg of Ashwagandha root extract, or a placebo twice daily for 60 days. Not only did the treatment group exhibit significant reductions in scores on all the stress-assessment scales, but their serum cortisol levels were also substantially reduced to within normal ranges relative to the placebo group [3].
In a small study exploring the safety and tolerability of Ashwagandha in healthy volunteers, a significant percentage reported improved sleep quality [4]. There is currently a prospective, randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled study underway to examine the effects of Ashwagandha on nonrestorative sleep, which is often both a result of stress and a direct cause of high cortisol levels as the body attempts to cope with chronic sleep deprivation or poor sleep quality [5].